Paradise

The Earth laughs in flowers.

nybg:

Ferns Borrowed Genes to Thrive in Low Light
Plants + Sunlight = Success, right? Well, in most instances, yes. Too little sun and many species of plants are on the ropes in short order. Unless we’re talking shade tolerance in ferns.
The arrival of flowering plants on the scene, back when dinos were tooling around chomping each other, should have proved a challenge to the ferns. It’s not all that easy to soak up the rays when the new school of plants is creating a shady canopy above you. But by borrowing a gene from the moss-like hornworts that gave ferns a taste for red- as well as blue-spectrum light, they put themselves back on an even playing field.
The gene, a “chimeric” example according to the Duke team behind this study, is known as Neochrome. And I’m not talking about the stuff in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Head through to find out more on how these frondy favorites picked up new sight from their mossy buddies. —MN
(Photo courtesy of Duke.edu)

nybg:

Ferns Borrowed Genes to Thrive in Low Light

Plants + Sunlight = Success, right? Well, in most instances, yes. Too little sun and many species of plants are on the ropes in short order. Unless we’re talking shade tolerance in ferns.

The arrival of flowering plants on the scene, back when dinos were tooling around chomping each other, should have proved a challenge to the ferns. It’s not all that easy to soak up the rays when the new school of plants is creating a shady canopy above you. But by borrowing a gene from the moss-like hornworts that gave ferns a taste for red- as well as blue-spectrum light, they put themselves back on an even playing field.

The gene, a “chimeric” example according to the Duke team behind this study, is known as Neochrome. And I’m not talking about the stuff in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Head through to find out more on how these frondy favorites picked up new sight from their mossy buddies. —MN

(Photo courtesy of Duke.edu)

northeastnature:

What a nicely descriptive name: this is spring beauty (Claytonia virginica). The bloom is male on the first day it opens, and female on the second. In this picture it’s displaying its male side, with prominent pink pollen-rich anthers. Tomorrow, these will bend back and the center will open to reveal the female parts.

northeastnature:

What a nicely descriptive name: this is spring beauty (Claytonia virginica). The bloom is male on the first day it opens, and female on the second. In this picture it’s displaying its male side, with prominent pink pollen-rich anthers. Tomorrow, these will bend back and the center will open to reveal the female parts.

rhamphotheca:

The snake is a Great Basin Rattlenake (Crotalus viridis lutosus) from the Wasatch Mountains just east of Salt Lake City, Utah. The snake was a rescue, having been removed from a backyard and returned to the wild. She was curious and good natured and never once rattled at me. What a sweetheart! Photograph and text by David E. Jensen
(via: Center For Snake Conservation)

rhamphotheca:

The snake is a Great Basin Rattlenake (Crotalus viridis lutosus) from the Wasatch Mountains just east of Salt Lake City, Utah. The snake was a rescue, having been removed from a backyard and returned to the wild. She was curious and good natured and never once rattled at me. What a sweetheart!

Photograph and text by David E. Jensen

(via: Center For Snake Conservation)

Australian Wildlife »

emuwren:

The American  Avocet - Recurvirostra americana, is a large wader in the avocet and stilt family, Recurvirostridae. Their breeding habitat is marshes, beaches, prairie ponds, and shallow lakes in the mid-west and on the Pacific coasts of North America.
Photo by Ron Dudley.

emuwren:

The American  Avocet - Recurvirostra americana, is a large wader in the avocet and stilt family, Recurvirostridae. Their breeding habitat is marshes, beaches, prairie ponds, and shallow lakes in the mid-west and on the Pacific coasts of North America.

Photo by Ron Dudley.

mypubliclands:

Happy Wilderness Wednesday’s from the BLM-Montana/Dakotas!

Today we’re highlighting the Seven Blackfoot Wilderness Study Area (WSA) located in northern Garfield County, about 30 miles northwest of the small town of Jordan, Montana which also serves as the county seat and hub for surrounding ranches in this portion of Missouri River country.

Photo: Mark Jacobsen, Public Affairs Specialist for the Eastern Montana/Dakotas District